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An investigation of spatial determinants of the birth size of child in the last two decades in India

Rahul Bawankule, International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS)

The study examines the clustering of birth size and investigate the potential effect of geographical areas on birth size after adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic risk factors in the last two decades in India. The study used the data from the first, second, and fourth rounds of the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) conducted in 1992-93, 1998-99, and 2015-16 respectively, in India. The study divides India into 74 natural zones for analytical purposes and used various geo-spatial techniques to analyze data. High-high clustering of smaller than average birth size was observed in western and south-western India in 1992-93, south-western and central India in 1998-99 and north-eastern India in 2015-16. The univariate Moran’s-I of the smaller than average birth size increased from 0.333 in 1992-93 to 0.456 in 2015-16. The spatial error regression model reveals unplanned pregnancies (%), unimproved toilet facilities (%), and solid cooking fuels (%) were significantly and positively associated with smaller than average birth size. The study concludes there is a significant shift in the spatial clustering and unplanned pregnancies (%), unimproved toilet facilities (%), and solid cooking fuels (%) emerged as significant spatial determinates of smaller than average birth size in the last two decades in India.

Keywords: Spatial analysis/regression, Spatial statistics, Children and youth, Fertility and childbirth

See extended abstract.

  Presented in Session 21. What Affects Child Health: Perspectives from India